IN-DEPTH: Day 18 “Little did I know that that was the highlight of my morning”

“Everyone! Assume the brace position! This plane is going DOWN!”

Well no, not really. Our moral bodies aren’t actually in danger, just our minds, souls and potential happiness.

So today we met with Zaheer again, and he freaked us all out a bit. He’s good at what he does, and I value that we have him to guide us and give us advice, but after we all spoke to him earlier I think we all went into DEFCON 1 [my nerdy friend Luke has confirmed that this is the most urgent DEFCON level]  mode. On the car ride into Yeoville, there was only the sound of silent panic, and the crunchiness of bites being taken by those of us eating our feelings (I’m sorry I ate all your snack, Anazi).

I think I’m mostly fine (even though I don’t feel fine, at all), but Zaheer is very sold on starting my video at Joburg Market, because it’s the most useful beginning to tell the story of my tomato. That’s great as an idea, and I agree with him, but getting permission to film there is proving freaking difficult! My e-mails have not been responded to, every time I call James is out of the office, and I’m running out of time because the equipment is being taken back out of circulation by the department on Friday (that’s another fight I’m looking forward to witnessing. Carol, Judy and Dinesh desperately tugging on one end of the camera, as myself or some other poor Honours student is clinging onto the other end, sobbing and screaming “NO! PLEASE! HAVE MERCY! I JUST NEED ONE MORE CUTAWAY! DON’T DO IT! NOOOOO!”).

Zel is probably the most stressed of us all – Zaheer says her video just isn’t interesting enough and needs to be completely changed. I don’t know what she’s going to do, but I’m hoping to have most of my footage done in the next few days so we can focus on just helping her. This afternoon we came back to the department and I finally got the time to talk to TJ about the shots that will be included in my feature. He’s been pretty helpful, and made suggestions that I just hadn’t considered before. Taking photos is difficult in Yeoville though, because people either freak out when you point a camera at them (and I am NOT getting stabbed over this) or asked to be paid – again, not a chance! I’ve already made the ‘Hi mom and dad, I love you so SO much and coincidentally am out of money’ phone call once this month.

Off the rumour mill: there may only be three macs for to be shared during editing. Between 17 classmates and 4 groups. In the period of a week that we will be editing. Again, this is not confirmed, but someone told me that today, and I really, really really really REALLY hope it’s not true/is sorted out soon, because if not we’re buggered.

Ending with something happy – this is some graffiti I found in the street today:

Sex is nice

Hope it’s made you smile, because I certainly got a chuckle from it 🙂 Onwards!

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About robykirk

Robyn was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, still isn't dead and despises writing in the third person. She received her undergraduate degree at Rhodes University, having completed a Bachelor of Arts in Politics, History and Journalism at the end of 2013 and completed her Honours in Journalism (career entry) at Wits University in Johannesburg during 2014. From April 2015 until March 2016 she worked as the Communications Intern for the MRC/Wits Agincourt Research unit in rural Mpumalanga. This blog is a collection of the work produced: - for the Wits University student newspaper and website Wits Vuvuzela during 2014 - during her internship at MRC/WIts Agincourt Research Unit (2015/2016) and independent blogging (2014-present). Robyn is interested in everything besides sports and mean people. In the past she has specialised in photojournalism and television journalism, and considers visual media to be one of her strongest skills. She decided to become a journalist because learning about other people’s lives was more fun than putting on pants and having her own. Follow her on Twitter: @RobyKirk

Posted on October 20, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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